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Best Choices for Garment Pleating

Friday, January 29, 2016
For the Garment Pleating project I've settled on the fabric choices for the three designs I'll be testing.  But I'm having trouble deciding on the style of pleating to use with each individual garment.  Can you help me out?
I've included in each graphic;   the garment design, the fabric choices and the possible styles of pleating for that garment.  It's worth noting that some garments are simply a loose fit while others are well over-sized.  The different styles of pleating will delivery either surface texture and only a small uptake in fabric volume, or a much greater uptake of fabric; up to 2-2.5 times for the Small Crush.

Pleating for the Shirred Bias Top:

The pattern for this design has been cut as a loose but elegant fit on the bias grain.  So the pleating style could provide surface interest/texture but not much reduction in the size of the garment.  Which do you prefer?  Crinkle or Spiderweb?

Pleating for the Folk to Fashion Tunic:

This is an oversized garment if you cut the pattern on the full width of of cloth: 150cm.  In this case the small crush pleating is suitable and will reduce the size of the garment.  Much like the Issey Miyake, Pleats Please method, you would fold the sleeves onto the body of the garment for pleating process.  You may get some interesting effects where the dominant line of the pleating opens out over the shoulder area.
If however your fabric is narrow, you'll end up with a loose fit tunic around AUSize: 12.  In this case I'd recommend one of the previous pleating styles (Crinkle or Spiderweb) to create interest in the surface for the fabric.


Pleating for the Drape Back Tunic:

This is definitely an oversized garment with plenty of fabric in the drape.  Your choice of pleating style could be either surface interest or a reduction in the size of the garment.  What do you think?  I'd love to hear your recommendations before I meet with the pleaters early this week.  :)

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Comments
Mioara Cretu commented on 30-Jan-2016 09:16 PM
In my opinion, the first design (bias shirred top) will look beautiful with both types of pleats - crinkle and Spiderweb. In the second design, more suitable to be longitudinal crinkle pleats. The third design (back drape dress) - I do not know. Maybe with small crush pleats. This design looks good if it is made of a soft material with very good draping, without pleats.
Anita commented on 01-Feb-2016 02:16 PM
Hi Mioara, thanks for dropping by. Yes I agree with your choices. The Drape Back Dress is a more experimental process. I'm interested to see what will happen to the drape when the pleating is included. :) I like a surprise!
Susanne Scott commented on 01-Mar-2016 02:15 PM
I like the idea of the small crush for the drape back dress, I think I would try the crinkle and for the 2nd design the spider web to take up more fabric and give it a bit of shape.
Anita - Studio Faro commented on 02-Mar-2016 09:49 AM
Hi Susanne, thanks for dropping by. :) yes I agree the small crush and crinkle should work well with the drape back dress. I hope to finish enough samples to be able to try two at least. Good idea about using spider pleat on the folk garment; I think that would have a dramatic effect on the garment. Certainly worth the experiment. :)

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