well-suited

Pattern Puzzle | Cut The Trends | Pattern Fundamentals | Pattern Insights | Pattern Fix | First Sample | Design & Illustration | Vintage Patterns | well-suited archive

Garment Pleating - Homage to Issey Miyake

Friday, January 22, 2016

While I wait for the local pleating house to finish their summer vacation, I'm moving onto the second phase of the Permanent Pleating Series - Garment Pleating.  In this series I'll be discussing whole garment pleating as originally inspired by the work of Issey Miyake (Pleats Please).

Early Work

I've done a little of this in the past and have used the crinkle pleating process to create texture and interest in simple garment designs.  

I'll be reviving my Shirred Bias Top from 2007.  Always a favourite, the success of this top lies in the semi-opacity of the fabric, the richness of print you can get in a  polyester and an uncomplicated fit that is both comfortable and elegant.  Somehow the pleating disguises/deconstructs the plasticity of the polyester fabric.  I have always fancied this top as a dress and will take this opportunity to test the design.  

What Now?

In moving forward from these historic examples, I've been checking through the blog and have found a number of pattern puzzles that would suit whole garment pleating.  Which of these designs is your pick for garment pleating?

The Dolman Coat  :  The Drape Back Dress  :  The Handkerchief Fold Dress  :  Squares & Zero Waste  :  Triangle Drape Dress  :  Folk to Fashion

In particular I'm keen to start using the existing Drape Back Dress pattern and cutting it in a polyester chiffon to test a couple of pleat types (mushroom and crinkle).  Top candidates at this time are Mushroom, Crush and Sunray Pleating.  Each will have a entirely different affect in the final garment. 

Design's suitable for Whole Garment Pleating

The most important quality in a garment design that you intend to 'pleat after make' is the flat, almost two dimensional nature of the garment before the pleating process.  If the garment lays entirely flat on the table, without any three dimensional details, then you should feel safe to pleat the style.  Some pleating techniques require the garment to be oversized before pleating while other methods of pleating provide a texture to the surface of the fabric without taking up too much of the fabric/fit.

Do you own any garments that have been pleated after making?  

Share this blog post:





Comments
Gail Le Bransky commented on 25-Jan-2016 08:36 PM
I had an unlined polyester blend jacket that I pleated quite accidentally after machine washing. It looked so much more interesting and never needed ironing again!
Anita commented on 26-Jan-2016 02:38 PM
Hi Gail, that sounds so familiar and I'm pleased you prefer the new pleated version of your jacket. I had a similar incident with one of my sunday circle skirts! Had to remove waistband, zipper and unpick seam to have the skirt re-pleated before re-making. After all it was a favourite skirt. :) Darn that exceptionally hot wash!

Post a Comment




Captcha Image

Trackback Link
http://www.studiofaro.com/BlogRetrieve.aspx?BlogID=8267&PostID=672770&A=Trackback
Trackbacks
Post has no trackbacks.


RSS

Using my content

All images, designs, photos and layouts on this blog are created and owned by Anita McAdam© of Studio Faro. They are available for home and personal use only.  If you would like to use our content for teaching or commercial purposes please ask.  I have some amazing resources for teachers and manufacturers. ;) enquiries@studiofaro.com

Recent Posts



ALL MY GARMENT BLOCKS

All my garment blocks.

If you can't find what you're looking for on this blog;  try our blog archive!



About Studio Faro

The challenging patterns, the exciting new design trends and the impossible drapes; that's what I live for.  Disclaimer: These new ideas are offered here for testing and are offered without guarantee.  Allow yourself time and space to truly test and perfect the patterns for all your new ideas.  And please don't give yourself a hard time if the first toile is less than perfect.  It's simply part of a process. Enjoy :)

Using my content

All images, designs, photos and layouts on this blog are created and owned by Anita McAdam© of Studio Faro. They are available for home and personal use only.  If you would like to use our content for teaching or commercial purposes please ask.  I have some amazing resources for teachers and manufacturers. ;) enquiries@studiofaro.com


Back to Top