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Hip Twist Top - Sewing Instructions

Monday, September 28, 2020
The Hip Twist Sewing Pattern has been a long time in coming, and I thank all of you for your patience.  The past few months have been less than usual and I've had my focus diverted on other projects closer to home.  Now it is such a pleasure to get back to business and deal with all my wonderful patterns.  In this blog post I'll be taking you step-by-step through the sewing process for this twist tee.  And a timely reminder that you'll get the best results with this pattern by using two-way stretch knit (four-way stretch in the US) that has elastane content (Lycra, Spandex).  I have achieved the best results with rayon, polyester and wool knits with elastane.  Some cotton knits may work if they are not too stiff.

The following diagram is one of the lay-plans for this pattern.  The most important aspect is that it depicts a single lay cut, with all pattern pieces being cut Right Side Up (R.S.U.).  If you have a look at the image above you'll see that the twist ends up on the left side of the body. 


 If however you prefer to have the twist on the right side of the body, simply turn the front pattern over before cutting a single lay.  The choice is yours, depending on if you prefer right or left side for the twist in this design.  Checkout the image below.



Knit fabric can be purchased in a variety of widths and I hope that I have covered all widths you come across below.  Every now and then I do come across some very wide knits, up to 180cm wide, but that is rare. 



Order of Construction as follows:
1.  Hem the inner curve at 1cm on the twist ends of the front pattern using collarette or stretch stitch.


2.  Twist the lower front pieces twice to create the twist knot.  Be aware that whichever piece twists last, will be the piece sitting on top of the knot in the final tee-shirt.


3.  Pin the horizontal seams in place from the side seam to the notch near the twist.


4.  Sew these seams on your four thread overlocker, or using a stretch stitch.  Sew from the side seam to as close as possible to the notch near the twist.  You have now completed the most complex part of this make.


5.  Join the shoulder seams, and include the jelly (see-through) elastic to maintain the length of your shoulder seam and prevent it stretching.


6. Prepare the neck bind by pressing it in half, lengthwise,  Then stitch the edges together to prepare it for adding to the neckline of your tee-shirt.


7.  Add the neck bind using your favourite method.  Be sure to stretch the neckband onto the neckline as you stitch, to get a flat crew band.  If you would like to make a lap-style neckband, like my sample, be sure to add another 5cm (2") onto the length of your neckband pattern piece before cutting.


8.  Add the sleeves into the armholes while the garment is still flat.


9.  Join the side seams, making sure the back hem is turned back in place.  Finish the back hem at 1.25cm (1/2") with a stretch stitch or collarette.


10.  Press up your sleeve hem at 1.25cm (1/2") and stitch, using a stretch stitch or collarette.


It is worth noting that the sample above was made at a longer length than the final pattern issued on the website.  It is 10-12cm (4-5") longer than the pattern.  The correct finished length for the pattern is featured in the first images in this post.

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All images, designs, photos and layouts on this blog are created and owned by Anita McAdam© of Studio Faro. They are available for HOME AND PERSONAL USE ONLY.  If you would like to use my content for teaching or commercial purposes please ask.  I have some amazing resources for teachers and manufacturers. ;) enquiries@studiofaro.com

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All images, designs, photos and layouts on this blog are created and owned by Anita McAdam© of Studio Faro. They are available FOR HOME AND PERSONAL USE ONLY.  If you would like to use our content for teaching or commercial purposes please ask.  I have some amazing resources for teachers and manufacturers. ;) enquiries@studiofaro.com


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