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Pattern Alterations - Flare and Gather Dress Pattern

Thursday, July 12, 2018
Now that the first sample has been made and fitted I'm able to bring you all the pattern alterations I have made to get this new design to work.  I'm still fascinated with this design and hope the final pattern is something worthy of all this sampling effort.  If you'd like to see the original pattern puzzle post you'll find it here:  Pattern Puzzle - Flare & Gather Dress
Pattern Alterations

It was a fun pattern to make but the sample below does show you how much work goes into these complex designs.  And even at this stage there's still a lot of work to do.  In this post I'll take you through most of the important changes I made to this pattern before going onto a second sample.
Flare and Gather
The fit alterations for this design are as follows:
  • The waist fit has to be increased (front and back) to hold the drape in place.
  • The front bias panel needs quite a lot of reduction to compensate for excess garment ease in the dress block and for the growth of the fabric on the bias.
  • The fit needs to be released over the backside on the left and right side (full butt adjustment).
  • The front neckline needs to be tightened and dropped by about 2.5cm.
  • The cap sleeve needs to be shortened by about 3cm.
  • The differential between the front and back hem is too much and needs to be reduced by dropping the back hemline by about 6cm.
Flare and Gather

For the fit alterations that I've pinned on the first toile, I mark them up in pencil or pen on the calico.  Then I take the calico toile to the pattern and transfer all the alterations onto the pattern.

Flare and Gather

To give the dress silhouette a sharp waist I'll have to increase the waist shaping in the back and the front dress (above).  
On the front right side panel (below) I have an opportunity to add more shape to the back side of the seam for the waist area.  For increasing the waist shaping in the back dress you'll find those notes a little further down in the post, together with hip fit alterations.

Flare and Gather

In the image below you can see the front bias panel, with all the gathered drape, needs to be tighten up to make the drape work across the front of the body.  If you would like to minimise the effect of the bias cutting on the fit you can start with a dress block that has less garment ease through the torso of the dress block.

Fit alterations Flare and Gather.

So this is something that happens to most bias cut dresses and will vary according to the fabric you use and how much garment ease you have in your dress block.  Any fabric cut on the bias has the tendency to grow and you can see in the front of this dress I've got loads of extra fabric pinned out through the centre front.  This is a very tricky pattern alteration.  So I've decided to take the excess fabric out through middle of the pattern (below).  You also have the option to remove this excess from the gather seam but you will have to be careful to maintain the seam shape.

Fitting Alterations

Looking at the image below you can see the fit over the backside has a tendency to grab (left side image).  To release the fit I'll be cutting through from the hem to the waist to add more width on the hip line (right side image).

Fittings for first sample.

In the image below you can see how I've cut through the back pattern from hemline to waist.  This move serves two purposes, one to release the fit over the hip and secondly to reduce the back waistline fit.  I've made the same move on both the left and right hand side of the pattern.

Flare and Gather Pattern Alts
First fittings Flare and Gather.

This final image is the beginning of the second sample testing.  I've used brown paper to show all the the pattern alterations that I've made to the first sample pattern. 

Second Sample Flare and Gather
Grab the RSS feed it you'd like to see how the second sample comes out. :)

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Comments
Anonymous commented on 14-Jul-2018 05:23 AM
all your makes are so interesting and unique. how you ever figure out the patterns i'll never know. not every one is to my taste but every one is certainly a winner.
my question is: after they're made, what happens with them? they're specific to your own size, i believe. most of them are not for every day, and there are certainly too many for one person's occasions, what do you do with them after you've blogged them? are they a teaching tool only?
Anita - Studio faro commented on 14-Jul-2018 11:01 AM
Hi Barbara, thanks for dropping by. Only a few of my pattern puzzles are samples. I do that mostly for the blog and blog followers. Perhaps a few are used in my teaching practice. Not all are made to my size. Mostly I make a standard AU size 12 which is my workroom dummy. Some of them can then be altered to fit me if I want to wear them for classes and teaching. And a few of them I'm working on to make as PDF patterns for the website. But that is such a long process. :/ Mostly they remain on my garment rail for further experiments for teaching and learning. And thanks for such a great question. I'm sure it's of interest to many who visit this blog. :)

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All images, designs, photos and layouts on this blog are created and owned by Anita McAdam© of Studio Faro. They are available for HOME AND PERSONAL USE ONLY.  If you would like to use our content for teaching or commercial purposes please ask.  I have some amazing resources for teachers and manufacturers. ;) enquiries@studiofaro.com

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All images, designs, photos and layouts on this blog are created and owned by Anita McAdam© of Studio Faro. They are available FOR HOME AND PERSONAL USE ONLY.  If you would like to use our content for teaching or commercial purposes please ask.  I have some amazing resources for teachers and manufacturers. ;) enquiries@studiofaro.com


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