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Pattern Puzzle - Simple Tuck Shift

Monday, September 08, 2014
As they say, the simple things are often the most difficult.  Or so I found out this weekend with the #PatternPuzzle.  What looks like a very simple style was in fact one of the most difficult patterns I have done in quite a while.Sketch and pattern making.

Using my fitted dress block, the first stage of pattern development is to alter the fitted shape of this block to a more relaxed fit.  This includes not using the waist darts and reducing the back length of the dress by taking 2cm out across the whole pattern.  The effect on the front dress is to increase the size of the bust dart.  And finally balancing the the dress block by moving the side seams forward, making the front and back the same width.
Tuck Shift Pattern Plan
The first stage of the pattern development is to transfer both of the front bust darts to the left shoulder.  As you can see in the first image below, this distorts the left side of the front dress placing excess length on one side of the dart.  To compensate for this excess we can fold a little out through the waist (red area).  This is not an entirely legitimate pattern making move but will help to balance the dart so we can  make the large tuck in the shoulder work.  In the third image the pattern is slashed open to add the desired amount of fabric for the shoulder tuck.
Tuck Shift pattern development.
 The final pattern below has both the front and back dress cut on the bias grain to make the most of the large front drape.  When making the first toile of this style you will may find the fold edge of the tuck to still a little too long.  To correct that problem, slash into the front tuck and reduce the long side before joining the pattern back together (much like the second image above).
Tuck Drape Final Patterns
If you are thinking of trying this pattern let me know if you have any questions through the comments section below.
Enjoy :)

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Comments
Alison Townley commented on 14-Jun-2016 09:01 AM
Hi I've been looking at this design for days , I really want to make it but although i used to sew all my own clothes I'm about 20 years out of practice.
I can see what you have done with the pattern but your written instructions baffle me. in particular "slash into the front tuck and reduce the long side before joining the pattern back together " I don't get it.

could you explain in more detail please, assuming no knowledge, I'm more than a bit rusty, and have never done any pattern cutting.
Anita - studiofaro commented on 14-Jun-2016 04:19 PM
Hi Alison, thanks for getting in touch. So sorry the instructions aren't clear. The dart transfer in this design is a little tricky and my instruction would probably only make sense to someone who has cut quite a few patterns. May I suggest you try out these other designs first:
http://www.studiofaro.com/well-suited/pattern-puzzle-vivienne-drape-dress
http://www.studiofaro.com/well-suited/pattern-puzzle-curved-seam-dress

sharon arber commented on 26-Jan-2017 07:23 AM
hi. I'd love to make this dress. I'm not sure how your website works. Do I take a basic shift dress pattern and alter it or am I able to download the pattern from your site.
Many thanks.
Sharon Arber
Anita - studiofaro commented on 30-Jan-2017 01:44 PM
Hi Sharon, thanks for dropping by. :) At the moment my site has all these pattern making posts and more recently I've added the blocks for you to make these patterns. You'll find my fitted dress block here: http://www.studiofaro.com/my-blocks-pdf It's the starting point for this design so you can cut your own pattern. Gradually I hope to add some finished sewing patterns of these designs to the site. If you're subscribed to the newsletter you'll be the first to hear when patterns are available on the site. You can subscribe here: http://www.studiofaro.com/contact Let me know if you have any questions. I'm always happy to help. :)
Ellis commented on 20-Feb-2017 12:04 AM
Hello Anita,

I love your patterns! Thanks for sharing them.

When constructing the simple tuck shift, do I only stitch the fold along the armhole, or do I also stich along the top bit, along the black broken lines running down from the shoulder, closing the top of the fold?

Happy greetings from Holland!
Anita - studiofaro commented on 20-Feb-2017 10:15 AM
Hi Ellis, thanks for dropping by. :) You'll stitch both. That is the broken lines running down from the shoulder to the marked end, then you'll be able to secure the fold down in the neckline curve. I have the large tuck facing out from the centre of the body.

I hope I've answered you question and that my explanation is clear. Feel free to ask more questions if not. :)
ellis commented on 20-Feb-2017 05:39 PM
Hi Anita,

Thank you so much for your quick reply!
Anita - studiofaro commented on 21-Feb-2017 02:33 PM
My pleasure Ellis. :) I'd love to see your sample when it's finished. My email: enquiries@studiofaro.com

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All images, designs, photos and layouts on this blog are created and owned by Anita McAdam© of Studio Faro. They are available for home and personal use only.  If you would like to use our content for teaching or commercial purposes please ask.  I have some amazing resources for teachers and manufacturers. ;) enquiries@studiofaro.com

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The challenging patterns, the exciting new design trends and the impossible drapes; that's what I live for.  Disclaimer: These new ideas are offered here for testing and are offered without guarantee.  Allow yourself time and space to truly test and perfect the patterns for all your new ideas.  And please don't give yourself a hard time if the first toile is less than perfect.  It's simply part of a process. Enjoy :)

Using my content

All images, designs, photos and layouts on this blog are created and owned by Anita McAdam© of Studio Faro. They are available for home and personal use only.  If you would like to use our content for teaching or commercial purposes please ask.  I have some amazing resources for teachers and manufacturers. ;) enquiries@studiofaro.com


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