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Pattern Puzzle - Two Layer Jersey Dress

Monday, September 29, 2014
Be Inspired!
Identify the elements in a design that you particularly like.  Using your drawing skills to re-work these elements in a design more suited to your needs or your market.  This is the beginning of design development in any new season, when you look to the top end of the market for inspiration.Dior Inspired Design

When re-working this design I have decided to use knit fabric rather than a woven.  For sampling I will probably use a two-way stretch knit to achieve the fit in the underdress.  And a medium weight viscose or modal knit for the overdress to achieve the desired drape.  

Set out below is the Pattern Plan using my knit block with the design and construction lines for both layers of this design.  There is a tube dress underneath and a much fuller over-dress with an exaggerated Hi-Lo hemline.  Extra lift in the Centre Front (CF) line has created a waterfall style drape.

Dior Two Layer Pattern Plan
For the first stage of the pattern development, trace the front and back over-dress, removing the gape darts for the neckline and including the Hi-Lo hem guidelines.  Divide the skirt part of the over-dress (from underbust area) into four vertical sections to expand and create the fullness in the hem.

First Pattern Development

In the second stage of this pattern development, cut the pattern open along the vertical lines to create flare in the hemline.  Add a consistent amount to each opening to maintain balance in the garment.  Lift the CF line up to introduce extra fabric for the waterfall drape.  Shorten the CF hemline to increase the waterfall effect in this area. 

Second Pattern Development

When tracing the final patterns, consider the placement of grain to get the best behaviour out of your particular knit fabric.  In this case I have centred the grain in both the front and back pattern pieces for the over-dress to maximise elegant drape through the side seams.

At this early stage I am thinking of joining the two dresses together at the top end of the side seam only, where they fully connect to each other on the pattern plan.  I will also include some elastic in the top edge of the under-dress to hold it in place.  Please note the markings on the pattern plan (for the under-dress) for the addition of some elastic over the bust and in the centre back (CB) area.

Two Layer Jersey final patterns.

I am hoping you all find these new ideas and pattern explorations as exciting as I do.  The idea behind this blog is to share the parts of my work that truly excite me.  The challenging patterns, the exciting new design trends and the impossible drapes.  That is what I live for.  And if I can excite you in the same way about making your own patterns, then my job is done.

Enjoy :)

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Comments
Candy Kuehn commented on 04-Jun-2015 04:39 PM

I truely love your blog...the pattern draping insight...thanks..I think the double drape dress is my favorite...thanks again!!!!!
Anonymous commented on 06-Jun-2015 09:37 AM
Thanks Candy for your compliments. Are you thinking of making any of the designs?
Julie-Ann Gilman commented on 30-Jul-2015 01:34 AM
I absolutely love your patterns as I love designs that make me think. You are one of the reasons I have decided to learn patternmaking and design. This dress is on the top of my to-do list. Thank you so much for giving my life some focus career/hobby-wise.
Anita commented on 30-Jul-2015 06:13 PM
Thanks Julie-Ann, that's one of the nicest things you could say. :) Good luck with your studies and drop by if you ever need a hand.
Anonymous commented on 15-Aug-2015 05:25 AM
what are the measurements for these?
Anonymous commented on 15-Aug-2015 09:52 AM
Hi there, thx for dropping by. there are no measurements as such. These are instructions to use with your own knit block. Lengths are indicated in the Pattern Plan but of course you choose measurements that suit you. Hope this helps. :)
Anonymous commented on 30-Jan-2016 04:03 AM
I really like this. My grandma used to do this type of sewing. She had four daughters and limited income, but they always wanted to look good. She could look at something in the window and go home and make it without a pattern, I know, copying, but would usually go further and make it her own. One that I remember was a jacket for a skirt-jacket suit where she split the pattern horizontally to incorporate the button holes and then top stitched the seams. It really looked classy. She didn't live long enough for me to learn all her tricks.
Anita commented on 01-Feb-2016 02:20 PM
Your grandma had all the sewing skills like many women of her time. When clothes were expensive, dressmaking skills were valued. Now that clothing is so cheap and disposable many don't regard dressmaking as such an important or valuable skill. My grandma also inspired my sewing and that inspiration made my career. :)
Ina Zitzer commented on 22-Mar-2016 04:33 AM
Amazing,I love it 😊
Anita - studiofaro commented on 22-Mar-2016 12:04 PM
Thanks Ina. :) Are you thinking of trying this pattern?

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All images, designs, photos and layouts on this blog are created and owned by Anita McAdam© of Studio Faro. They are available for home and personal use only.  If you would like to use our content for teaching or commercial purposes please ask.  I have some amazing resources for teachers and manufacturers. ;) enquiries@studiofaro.com

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The challenging patterns, the exciting new design trends and the impossible drapes; that's what I live for.  Disclaimer: These new ideas are offered here for testing and are offered without guarantee.  Allow yourself time and space to truly test and perfect the patterns for all your new ideas.  And please don't give yourself a hard time if the first toile is less than perfect.  It's simply part of a process. Enjoy :)

Using my content

All images, designs, photos and layouts on this blog are created and owned by Anita McAdam© of Studio Faro. They are available for home and personal use only.  If you would like to use our content for teaching or commercial purposes please ask.  I have some amazing resources for teachers and manufacturers. ;) enquiries@studiofaro.com


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