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Pattern Puzzle - Vintage Booty Dress

Monday, January 19, 2015
It was a demanding Pattern Puzzle this week that ran live across all time zones and gave everyone a chance to join in.  You can see by the patten shapes below that the final move of adding the front side panel to the back side panel was just enough to make it a very challenging game.  Huge thanks to all fans and friends for dropping by and making it a great day. Draft a Vintage Dress Pattern

The inspiration behind this particular design was from a photo snippet from The Tailors Desire tumblr blog.  A visual vintage fest!  The focus is the gathered drape over the seat of the dress.  The balance of the design is about a stylish but understated garment leaving all the attention for the drape.

Vintage ideas

Using my fitted dress block or similar basic dress pattern:
  1. Extend the shoulder line to make a shaped, cap sleeve.
  2. Adjust the underarm point at the side seam for a sleeveless fit.  
  3. Mark in the front princess panel seam shaping it to toward the waistline, to connect with the back waist seam.
  4. Draw in the front neckline and add the rectangles to both necklines for a built-up collar.
  5. Mark in gape darts for the front armhole and neckline.
  6. Taper the dress side seams from hip to hem approx. 3cm at hem.
  7. Shape the back shoulder yoke seam making allowance to fold out the back shoulder dart.
  8. Shift the top half of the back waist dart closer to the centre back line and draw a half sphere from the waist level to the centre back line.
  9. Draw in cut lines through the back and front skirts, radiating from the sphere, for the inclusion of extra fabric for the gathered drape.
  10. Add 1 cm of shaping at the waist level on the centre back seam.
  11. Cut along the style lines and fold out all dart allowances.  Add extra fabric for the gathered drape in the back skirt.

Use My Fitted Dress Block.

The final pattern pieces below represent half the pattern.  The larger pattern piece for the front and back dress can be Cut 1 Pair with a CB seam to keep the CF on the straight grain.  It is possible the cut the CB line on the fold if the fabric is stable enough to be off grain on the CF seam where the zip is inserted.  The medium size pattern piece is a combination of the side front panel and back bodice.
  It is possible to cut these pieces separately if required.  The cutting instructions are Cut 1 to Fold.  The back yoke has a centre seam and is Cut 1 Pair.

Final Sewing Patterns.
Note the placement of the grain on the front dress is parallel to the original centre front.  This will place the gathered drape on the back skirt on the bias grain with a CB seam.  You can also cut this pattern with the CB on the fold but you'll need wide fabric or a smaller hem circumference.  Other considerations are the finish of the dress.  I think I would cut a facing for the front neckline and opening.  The back yoke could be cut as a double layer and what is left of the armhole can have an 6mm/¼" inside bind.  The dress may also be fully lined.

Hoping you all enjoy the post and this new style.  Feel free to ask any questions you have in the comments section below.  Always happy to help.  :)

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Comments
Lauriana commented on 19-Jan-2015 05:28 PM
What a lovely dress! I really didn't guess this from the puzzle. I knew there had to be gathers and was starting to consider the correct edge as center front but no...
I may have to try and make this one at some point. I'm already wondering what kind of fabric would work best...
Anita commented on 20-Jan-2015 09:33 AM
Hi Lauriana, thanks so much for your 'mentoring' activities on Saturday. Much appreciated. :) For fabric I would prefer a wool/acrylic, satin-backed crepe or simply a wool crepe of medium weight. I think the satin-backed crepe is more stable and would handle the centre front zip better. Maybe one day, if you are interested, you can put up a #PatternPuzzle of your own creation. ;)
Lauriana commented on 22-Jan-2015 03:30 AM
I agree with the fabric suggestions. However, the wool crepe I just used (for the dress that's on my blog now) would definitely be too thick for such dense gathers. Which is a bit of a shame because I have more of it ;)

And of course I'd be interested in putting on a PatternPuzzle one day. Not right now though, it's worth doing well ;)
Anita-studiofaro commented on 23-Jan-2015 06:03 PM
Hi Lauriana, Good news that you may do a pattern puzzle one day. :) Maybe you could pleat the thincker wool crepe for the back detail and maybe use add less fullness.
Amina commented on 09-Feb-2017 05:18 AM
Merci pour les d├ętails
Anita - studiofaro commented on 09-Feb-2017 11:04 AM
My pleasure Amina. :) Are you thinking of making this dress pattern?

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All images, designs, photos and layouts on this blog are created and owned by Anita McAdam© of Studio Faro. They are available for home and personal use only.  If you would like to use our content for teaching or commercial purposes please ask.  I have some amazing resources for teachers and manufacturers. ;) enquiries@studiofaro.com

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The challenging patterns, the exciting new design trends and the impossible drapes; that's what I live for.  Disclaimer: These new ideas are offered here for testing and are offered without guarantee.  Allow yourself time and space to truly test and perfect the patterns for all your new ideas.  And please don't give yourself a hard time if the first toile is less than perfect.  It's simply part of a process. Enjoy :)

Using my content

All images, designs, photos and layouts on this blog are created and owned by Anita McAdam© of Studio Faro. They are available for home and personal use only.  If you would like to use our content for teaching or commercial purposes please ask.  I have some amazing resources for teachers and manufacturers. ;) enquiries@studiofaro.com


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