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Sewing Instructions for The Patent Blouse

Wednesday, September 18, 2019
Now that this pattern has been released on the website, it's time to put up some sewing instructions.  At first the pattern shape appears weird and unusual, as it did for me when I first found this little beauty at the US patent office.  The original blog post describes my process - Pattern Puzzle - The Patent Blouse.  When cutting your own Patent Blouse, please make sure you use two-way stretch knit for the best results (four-way stretch knit in the US).

I just love this oversized, slightly abstracted print.  However, it does present a bit of a challenge when trying to pattern match for this unusually shaped pattern.  My solution was to include a CB (centre back) seam so that I could pattern match through the CF (centre front) seam.  If you don't have a lot of experience sewing stretch fabrics, it's important to understand that you don't have to own an overlocker.  With practice and some testing, you can use a domestic machine as long as you work out your different stitch types for seams and hems.
 

 
The first move is to sew that CB seam (zig zag or four thread safety stitch), hopefully matching what you can of the abstract print.  Stitch the CF seam from the hemline to the notch, 5cm from the cut edge.  Because we're using two-way stretch fabric (four-way in the US), you'll have to use a stretch stitch for your seams.  In this case, I've used a 2x3 zig zag on a domestic sewing machine.
 

 
To give this blouse a bit of weight and quality on the neckline, I've included a 5cm (2") turn-back along the CF seam, through to the neckline. Press and pin the 5cm (2") turn-back facing into place and cover stitch (or zig zag for domestic machines) for the neckline and CF seam.
 

 
In this case I've used a wave like stretch stitch along the full length of the 5cm (2") turn back.  For consistency in the finish of the garment, I'll be using this stitch on the armhole turning and the hem.
 

 
For the armhole, press a 1cm (⅜") turning between the armhole notches.  Use your stretch stitch to secure the 1cm turning in place.

 
Now to sew the back 'V' seam - Pin one side of the back seam, from the armhole notch to the top of the CB seam.
 

Stitch (zigzag or four thread safety stitch) the seam in place, finishing at the low point of the back 'V' seam.  Leave the four-thread tail, from stitching on the armhole end of the seam, so you can secure this end of the seam later.


 
Pin the other side of the back 'V' seam, from the armhole notch to the CB seam, through to the lower centre back seam, to the hemline.

Stitch through this final seam, using a zig zag stitch or four thread safety stitch.  Remember to leave the tail of the four thread stitch on the armhole end so you can score the seam later.
 

 
To secure the armhole end of the back 'V' seam, tuck the tail of the four-thread stitch behind the seam allowance and stitch through to prevent the seam unraveling.
 

 
Press up and pin a 2cm (¾") hem around the lower edge of the blouse.  For stretch knit hems I always limit myself to a 2cm (¾") hem depth to prevent 'roping' in the final hem sewing.
 

 
Finish your Patent Blouse with a stretch hemstitch, using the same stitch that you used for the armhole and CF turning (zigzag or cover stitch), depending on what sewing machines you have access too.
 

 
If you have any questions about this pattern or the sewing process, don't hesitate to use the comments section below. :)  If you'd like to share your photos of this blouse you can join my Facebook group, or Instagram.  To be sure I see the posts please use my handle @studiofaro or the hashtag #PatentBlouse.

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All images, designs, photos and layouts on this blog are created and owned by Anita McAdam© of Studio Faro. They are available for HOME AND PERSONAL USE ONLY.  If you would like to use our content for teaching or commercial purposes please ask.  I have some amazing resources for teachers and manufacturers. ;) enquiries@studiofaro.com

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The challenging patterns, the exciting new design trends and the impossible drapes; that's what I live for.  Disclaimer: These new ideas are offered here for testing and are offered without guarantee.  Allow yourself time and space to truly test and perfect the patterns for all your new ideas.  And please don't give yourself a hard time if the first toile is less than perfect.  It's simply part of a process. Enjoy :)

Using my content

All images, designs, photos and layouts on this blog are created and owned by Anita McAdam© of Studio Faro. They are available FOR HOME AND PERSONAL USE ONLY.  If you would like to use our content for teaching or commercial purposes please ask.  I have some amazing resources for teachers and manufacturers. ;) enquiries@studiofaro.com


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