Womens Knit Block Tag

My design this week featured below has a single twist in the front bodice, a turn-back drape on the front hem and a two piece back to maintain the empire fit that holds the bust twist in place.
If you'd like to learn my method for creating Twist Drape Patterns I have a detailed worksheet for making Jersey Twist Patterns. For just a few dollars you'll get the same training you'd get if you came to the workshop in my studio.

The sketch below is trend research from 2009 for knitwear, Summer 2011.  I'm usually not a fan of overtly asymmetric cutting and will always feel a little odd if one sleeve is so much shorter than the other.  But with this design, I am strangely compelled to give it a chance.
I think it may look interesting using different knits for each of the panels.

This is a typical Pattern Puzzle design that I have chosen specifically for the weird shape the front dress pattern piece can make.   As one pattern piece for the front, it's a strange and very wasteful shape.  Indulgent and fun for a one-of, but not so acceptable for production.  It is more likely that it would be cut in three separate pieces with seams hidden under the large drape tucks in the bust and hip area.

I began the puzzle development with the idea that this jersey style would have a raglan sleeve cut in a stretch mesh.  That is, to add a textural contrast and lighten the design.  But the day was a bit of a scorcher and somehow the design morphed into a top with cutaway armholes.  Too many thoughts of warm breezy days on the beach I think.  Anyway, I didn't notice and then posted the pattern shape as a one-piece pattern.  It is important to note that the armholes would be very different for raglan and sleeveless, but all will be explained.

Mioara Cretu, a textile teacher from Iassy, Romania submitted the fabulous pattern shape you see below.  Such a challenging shape had our #PatternPuzzlers staying back after school to solve the problem.  With collective zeal Julie Eilber, Alison Calderwood and Karen Vogelsang finally solved the puzzle early Wednesday morning.  Such stamina!
Mioara has a particular interest in clothing made a jersey and admires the Donna Karan idea of the 'one pattern dress' achieved by removing the side seams with clever pattern making.

With this design I'm showcasing jersey twists, using two-way stretch (four-way in the US) knit fabric.  The front of the dress features two single twists, with a circular hem panel and an insert fishtail godet in the centre back seam.  If you'd like to learn my method for creating Twist Drape Patterns I have a detailed worksheet for making Jersey Twist Patterns.  For just a few dollars you'll get the same training you'd get if you came to the workshop in my studio.  As they are both single twists it is important that the front is cut double (self-lined), or you use a double knit fabric that is good both sides.  Also essential that the jersey has elastane, that is two-way stretch.

The inspiration behind Saturday's Pattern Puzzle has been doing the rounds of a few designers over the past 12 months.  I have cut it at least twice for different clients in the past year.  In the world of drape, it's definitely the new kid on the block.  Simple and uncomplicated this style has a casual and formal application.  I personally like the casual application and plan to make it as a tunic top to go over jeans or a long slim skirt.

In this second stage, the 'nejiri' Twist evolves into something new.  Continuing on from the earlier photo tutorial post about my investigations into yet more twist patterns.  It's important to remember that the success of these twists depends on using two-way stretch knit.  Both the existing toiles in this test are merino and merino blends with elastane.
Alterations to the first sample included reducing the upper body length to refine the drape and tightening the hip fit so the twist will stay in place.

The detailed solution to Saturday's Pattern Puzzle.  Using a Studio Faro Knit Block I trace out the front and back blocks with side seams facing each other with a minimum 6cm gap.  Also, trace out the knit sleeve that belongs to the block.  Following are the details of the pattern plan.

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