Skirt Block Tag

With some very clever spatial reasoning our fans we able to solve all the detail in Saturdays #PatternPuzzle.  They were cutting up bits of paper and making impossibly small skirts into the wee hours to reveal all the answers.  They make our Saturdays so much fun.  :)  This weeks #PatternPuzzle was inspired by one of those pins without a link to the source but I'm pretty sure it's a Donna Karan.  I did leave off a bit of the frippery (small drape near the waist) as I prefer a cleaner style and there is already so much going on in this skirt.  Pinstripe fabric is the driving force in this design, with the directional use making so much of the intricate panels.  The Colour Map below will help make sense of all the pattern pieces and where they belong in the skirt.

Our Saturday's #PatternPuzzle attracted a few new players and some very interesting answers.  Turning the pattern shape upside-down for the puzzle post will always challenge perceptions.  By the afternoon Doris had identified the shape as a skirt, then Andra gave us the detail of all the features in the skirt.

This treasure was discovered in the archives of The Metropolitan Museum along with thousands of other beautiful pieces.  Much to my surprise, I discovered that it is a fairly recent design by John Galliano for The House of Dior in 1998.
For this puzzle, the focus is on the skirt and not the tailored halter neck top.  The combination of the well-organised waterfall drape at the back of the skirt and the cowl drape in the front of the skirt was fascinating to me.

In developing the ideas for this puzzle it occurred to me that there are many ways to make a twist skirt pattern.  What came out of that process are the pattern images below that offer two ways to cut a twist skirt.
The sketches below give you an idea of the anticipated results of the different styles of twist.  If you'd like to learn my method for creating Twist Drape Patterns I have a detailed worksheet for making Jersey Twist Patterns.   The first sketch and pattern on the left is the single twist, and the sketch and pattern on the right are for the double twist.  In the first, we twist the lower skirt of the main pattern and in the other, we twist two tail shape pieces and join them back to the skirt.

With this weeks post of the pattern solution and detail, I must apologise for the delay in posting.  It turns out my original pattern shape was not entirely accurate.  As I prepared this post I realised that the pattern shape would not necessarily achieve the fit I had sketched in the design drawing.  This is not an uncommon problem when translating design drawings to actual patterns, which is why we often have to sample a couple of times to perfect the fit.

This is an idea from my Sketchbook (visual diary), from at least 3-4 years ago.  I believe I found it in a forecast magazine of that time (Textile View).  The design is elegant but may have some inherent problems to be dealt with in the first toile/prototype.   Your fabric choice will be important as the ruching suggests much of this skirt will be cut on the bias and there may be a little tension between the ruching around the thighs and the flare I have drawn into the hem.  I'm also concerned that the gathered hip yoke could be puffy if not sewn well.  I would probably work with a light-weight, finely woven wool suiting as I know from experience that it behaves well when cut on the bias.
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