Creative Pattern Making

Trawling through my blog post archive I've come to realise that many of my posts have vintage content, and I discover there are at least twenty vintage posts!  So this Vintage Inspired Round-Up is to refresh your memory of some of my earlier Pattern Puzzle posts and to share a few points in history where vintage style has influenced my work.  Where does it all start?

We've already worked out how important it is to consider the effects you want from your permanent pleating and how that may impact on the overall design of the garment.  The examples below show the variable impact of the decision to Hem Before or Hem After.  Both skirts are half-circle.  The skirt on the left is Sun-ray Pleated and the skirt on the right is Sun-ray Crush pleated.  The more precise and formal aspect of the Sun-ray pleat (left) really suits the clean finish of hemming before sending to the pleaters.  Whereas the example on the right, with a more casual, rough pleating style, visually benefits from the kick in the hemline as a result of sewing the hem after pleating.

Back in the land of blogging and I've made a #FirstSample of the Vivienne Drape Dress.  Many of my pattern puzzles start with my Women's Fitted Dress Block (PDF available) and every student builds a pattern plan for the development of this special design.  All-in-all I think it turned out ok.  I will be moving the dip in the waistline a little closer to the centre front (CF) and taking the cut lines for the drape with it.  Checkout the revised pattern plan below.

For this #PatternPuzzle post, you have an elegant Drape Skirt that can be cut from my basic skirt block or any pencil skirt pattern.  My Skirt Block is now available here as a PDF download.  I've included some interesting seaming that works well with the drape feature that's included in the front left skirt.

Does anyone remember this little pattern puzzle from last year?   It's been a long time waiting in the wings for posting.  An innovation on an existing theme, this single twist is ingenious in that a cowl is built as part of the twist pattern.   The final effect being a more subtle twist with a relaxed fit.  If you'd like to learn my method for creating Twist Drape Patterns I have a detailed worksheet for making Jersey Twist Patterns.  For just a few dollars you'll get the same training you'd get if you came to the workshop in my studio.  My Knit Block is also available as a PDF download.

Did you ever think there'd be so many designs using Twist Drape?  I was totally captivated with the asymmetric aspect of this design and the layering effects that can be achieved using two different fabrics and my knit block.  Like the majority of previous twists you'll definitely need a two-way stretch knit for this to work well.  The elastane (Lycra/Spandex) in your knit fabric is the best tool for achieving a snug fit with this method of making twist patterns.  If you'd like to learn my method for creating Twist Drape Patterns I have a detailed worksheet for making Jersey Twist Patterns.  For just a few dollars you'll get the same training you'd get if you came to the workshop in my studio.

This entire post is inspired by my fascination with circular knits.  I've not had much experience with this particular cloth but have always been hooked by the possibilities.  I found this piece (slight grey marl cotton) at the back of one of the local fabric shops and grabbed a couple of meters to play with.  My first idea was to try the twist, especially with a fabric that's half-way to dressing you without any side seams.
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