Self-draft

Welcome all to this somewhat delayed blog post.  I am gradually catching up and would like to thank you for your patience.  The idea with this puzzle was to test one of those apparently simple pattern shapes you so often find on the net.  Every now and then we all come across stuff on the internet that suggests the simplest cuts will make the most flattering garments.  Who can say until you have actually made the thing up.  :)  This pattern is based on multiple squares in a variety of sizes with a little adjustment on the stand.

Gil Brandao's patterns have a seductive quality in their simplicity and clarity.  Often with pattern making instructions, simplicity is no more than an absence of information that can be finally very frustrating.  Not so for Gil.  His diagrams have all the required information.  So much so that my inability to read Portuguese does not present a problem.

At last the detail for the Saturday #PatternPuzzle is here!  My apologies for the delay to our usual posting but I had a little trouble with my graphics.  It was a wonderful round of creative answers and clever solutions that finally solved this puzzle.  Our Handkerchief Fold Dress is so named because it struck me that the construction of this dress is much like a handkerchief with the corners folded into the centre.

I finally had a chance to use some of the wonderful work in the Gil Brandao book.  In particular, this pattern hooked me from the beginning as it doesn't seem to make any sense.  To start with, the thing that looks like a dart is really an armhole?  And that thing that looks like a sleeve is in fact, a waist tie. As you can imagine I was looking forward to an interesting fitting.

It's a mean thing to present the fans with a rectangle as a #PatternPuzzle and expect them to describe the garment.  In my defence, I did include a couple of very small notches as a clue.  In the end, Mioara was able to produce an almost exact image of the idea in knit fabric. I think we may have been reading the same pattern making books.  :) I found this image on Pinterest, but have had no luck finding the original source material.  If anyone knows the origin of this piece I would love to be able to include the correct information here.

The Patent Blouse has become a favourite top for me after the first set of samples were very wearable.  It has become such a favourite that I managed to wear out my first red sample very quickly.  Unfortunately rayon is not made to last and very soon the surface of the knit was a little shabby with pilling.  I have promised myself that the next red patent blouse will be made in merino.  July 2019:  This pattern has now been added to the website as a PDF download - The Patent Blouse Sizes XS-XXL

Last weekend's #PatternPuzzle was a little different from our usual pattern shapes.  From the conversation you can see that some pattern pieces are obvious and some not so much.  The self-drafted image below is one of the most effective examples I have come across of zero-waste pattern making, typical of a lot of folk costume construction.

Here is the anonymous shape that was posted on our Facebook Page.  A self-drafted rectangle with three notches - that's all they got!  And they were very creative with the information.  Have a look at the comments!  And this is the Vintage Pattern (now reissued as Simplicity 8452) that started me off on a quest to make and understand how a simple, self-drafted rectangle shape becomes this elegant top?!?

Vintage Curiosity to Self-Drafted Pattern Puzzle - Wandering around in Pinterest I re-pinned the images below to my #cuttthatfrock album.  I was fascinated with the strange little pattern diagram on the back of the envelope.  The images claim that this simple shape would make that wrap top and that you can wear it wrapped from the front or the back.  Mmmm... big claims for a simple shape and such sophisticated drawings!  Convinced I could scale this up to make sense of it, I imported the image in to illustrator.
error: This content is protected !!