Asymmetric Cowl Drape

Asymmetric Cowl Drape

Elegant and flattering, this is an interesting cut in a knit fabric.  By using my Knit Block or your favourite tee shirt patterns, you can self-draft the front pattern piece to drape while leaving the back and sleeve patterns exactly as they are.  It’s a looser shape than many drape tops and is cut with a more gentle fitting rather than hugging tight to the body.  That slightly looser, non-grabby tee shirt is always flattering and much easier to wear.

For this pattern development; trace out a full front of your block (for the asymmetric detail), a half back block and full sleeve block (as below):
  1. Move the back shoulder line forward by 1cm and remove similar from the front shoulder line.
  2. For the looser fit in the tee shirt; drop the underarm point on the bodice and sleeve by 1-1.5cm.
  3. Soften off the side seam on the back block and add shape to the centre back seam at the waist.
  4. Mark the drape lines in the front bodice.  They are placed where you would like the cowl to drape in your final garment.  I have followed the slight off-centre drape lines I have in my sketch.
  5. The top left side of the front is where the large tuck is located.  This section is shaded in the pattern development.
Cut open the separate pieces of the front bodice.  Please note the shaded area in the pattern plan is three layers of a large shoulder tuck that leads to the Cowl Drape.  As you open up the pattern think about the cloth you are using and how much extra fabric (drape) you would like in the design.  There are no hard and fast rules as drape will behave differently with different fabrics, especially in knits.  With this kind of new design development work, it’s important to be aware that it may take more than one toile to achieve a final garment you’re happy with.
The sleeve and back pattern piece are, as you would expect, in most knit tops.  Centre back seam shaping has been added to this style.  Cutting instructions for the front pattern are Cut 1 R.S.U to keep the drape on the right shoulder as per design sketch.  If the grainline for the front pattern is squared (90 degrees)from the front hem then the drape from the shoulder tuck will be mostly on the bias.  This usually results in a softer drape for most knits.  For the simplest of finishes, an outside bind on the neckline is more than acceptable.  For evening fabrics you may want to use an inside bind.
Drapey knits of modal, viscose, polyester and some cotton blends will drape well for this style.  But the drape is not ideal for the stiffer 100% cotton knits.  Let me know if you have any questions about these instructions.  Always happy to help.  🙂
Anita McAdam
enquiries@studiofaro.com
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