Drape Shift

Drape Shift

Solved with lightening speed by Alison Calderwood, Julie Eilber and RedPointTailor, last Saturdays #PatternPuzzle turns out to be a fab summer shift.  The image below has the puzzle shape right way up with some notations to help make sense of the thing.   Some of you may remember the Cowl Tee with Drape and Draped Tee from way back that feature the same kind of drape seam as this weeks puzzle.

 So the first question:  ‘Do we try to make this pattern from a knit or woven block?’
The sketch above does suggest a light weight drapey fabric and for my first attempt I would use a one-way stretch knit fabric.  Probably a Cotton/Rayon blend so we have the cotton for breathability and comfort, and the rayon for drape.  If all works out well you might try the slightly more complex pattern making required to cut this style from a woven.
 For my first development I have used my close fitting knit block and dropped the side seams down to dress length.  The detail in the Pattern Plan above includes:
  1.  relaxing off the block fit to allow for a one-way stretch knit and looser fit in this shift. 
  2.  dropping the underarm point by about 1.5cm. adding a ‘V’ neck front and back. 
  3.  planning gape darts in the front neckline to tighten the shape of the ‘V’, to hold it close to the body. 
  4.  placement of the drape seam working from the CF toward the right hip. 
  5.  extra shaping on the CB seam to flatter the figure. 
 The diagram above outlines the original shape of the knit block used and shows exactly where the extra fabric for the drape is placed.   It also illustrates the move that lifts the front drape seam line so as to maintain the drape seam in its original place and length.  Please note that the hemline needs a clean curve to enable a quality hem finish.  To finish the neckline and the armhole I would probably use a 6mm (1/4″) bind that could be finished outside (showing) or inside (stitch only shows).
If you have your own knit block at home, give this a try and let me know how you go.  My sample cut (above) will include a three-quarter sleeve that has a seam running through the overarm to make the sewing so much easier.
I’m happy to answer any of your questions as you work through your pattern and first toile.  Feel free to email me direct, or leave your comments on this post.   Enjoy 🙂
 MAKERS
Anita McAdam
enquiries@studiofaro.com
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