Using My Blocks

The inspiration behind Saturday's Pattern Puzzle has been doing the rounds of a few designers over the past 12 months.  I have cut it at least twice for different clients in the past year.  In the world of drape, it's definitely the new kid on the block.  Simple and uncomplicated this style has a casual and formal application.  I personally like the casual application and plan to make it as a tunic top to go over jeans or a long slim skirt.

So here is the lovely coincidence.  After deciding the pattern development was suitable for the Saturday morning Pattern Puzzle, I then remembered that the design was part of an earlier post about Design Development. There is even some video footage on Youtube showing everyone the design development process - Fashion Design Development - WhiteonWhite Trend 2014

Last week I received an email from CarmencitaB regarding a slightly tricky pattern she has been puzzling with for a little while.  And you all know I love a challenge and the results are in this post.  Firstly some picture references (from CarmencitaB) for the direction we are going in:

In this second stage, the 'nejiri' Twist evolves into something new.  Continuing on from the earlier photo tutorial post about my investigations into yet more twist patterns.  It's important to remember that the success of these twists depends on using two-way stretch knit.  Both the existing toiles in this test are merino and merino blends with elastane.
Alterations to the first sample included reducing the upper body length to refine the drape and tightening the hip fit so the twist will stay in place.

Following on from the earlier post for the Pattern Puzzle - Empire cowl Knit I have the chance here to detail the manipulation of the pattern pieces to achieve the new design.   Below is the production sketch of the style.  I hope to eventually develop all these styles into pattern making worksheets for the website.

This is an idea from my Sketchbook (visual diary), from at least 3-4 years ago.  I believe I found it in a forecast magazine of that time (Textile View).  The design is elegant but may have some inherent problems to be dealt with in the first toile/prototype.   Your fabric choice will be important as the ruching suggests much of this skirt will be cut on the bias and there may be a little tension between the ruching around the thighs and the flare I have drawn into the hem.  I'm also concerned that the gathered hip yoke could be puffy if not sewn well.  I would probably work with a light-weight, finely woven wool suiting as I know from experience that it behaves well when cut on the bias.

The last Pattern Puzzle generated some curiosity so I have decided to take it from the "what a great idea" stage to reality.  This will reveal all potential issues as we work our way through all stages of prototyping to the final sample.
To begin I have a Production sketch with clear front and back views.  For this pattern I am using my undarted kimono block to begin my pattern plan.  When working with this block I tend to work the back and front on top of each other.  The reason is that so much of this block is the same front to back with the exception of the necklines and the shoulder/overarm line.  (If this is not clear please comment and ask - always, always happy to respond).  Pic below is the entire pattern plan, with more detail in the following images.
error: This content is protected !!