Vintage Patterns

The beauty of this Folk to Fashion zero-waste pattern is that you can select your fabric width to determine different sizing outcomes in the final garment.  And the length of your available fabric will determine the final length of your garment and sleeve.  This garment is an historic pattern called a Eura, believed to be worn as an undergarment around 500-1,000 AD.

I've seen this fabulous dress idea on Pinterest for so long now, I finally had to try it out.  I'm not entirely sure that I'd get it made in one hour, particularly if you include making the pattern.  I tracked the inspiration down to a fabulous blog called Festive Attyre.  You should pop over to their website and checkout all the great ideas.  There are two slightly different versions of this dress on the blog.  In this case, I've tried only one of them and I'm seriously impressed.  In this sample I've used a cotton voile, that would need a petticoat underneath if I planned on wearing it.  I think it would make the best high summer frock ever.  Loose and cool, all at the same time.

Now that this pattern has been released on the website, it's time to put up some sewing instructions.  At first the pattern shape appears weird and unusual, as it did for me when I first found this little beauty at the US patent office.  When cutting your own Patent Blouse, please make sure you use two-way stretch knit for the best results (four-way stretch knit in the US).

This unusual sewing pattern has been featured on my blog for a very long time.  As early as December, 2013.  Right from the very beginning it's been a favourite.  I've made myself at least eight of these tops in a great variety of fabrics: merino/lycra, viscose/elastane, cotton/elastane and rayon/elastane.  It's really important to understand that all fabrics for my samples are two-way stretch jersey (four-way in the US) with some elastane content (lycra/spandex).  My favourites are the merino/elastane, with a soft, draped handle in both red and black. You can get yourself a copy of this amazing sewing pattern, here on my website: The Patent Blouse Sizes XS-XXL.

Since I've been online (6 years now) I've become aware of an enormous love for vintage style out there, and in particular vintage patterns. And in some strange way, these patterns are so familiar to me.  I must have used some of my grandmother's patterns when I was younger because the lack of instructions and complete absence of print on these vintage patterns doesn't confuse or put me off at all.  Somehow it appears to me as a secret code I have to solve to uncover the exact intentions of the designer/pattern maker.

In this post I hope to link up some of the illustration and patternmaking resources I have on the website so you can plan your pattern making creativity over the summer break.  These suggestions are a combination of free access blog posts, PDF worksheets with pattern making instructions and Digital Garment Blocks to begin all your pattern making projects.

This is a short but dedicated post for all those lovers of Vintage Style.  The focus is on using my fitted dress block to design and cut your own vintage dress sewing patterns.  To work your way through the fitting process you can go to SHOP on the menu bar and checkout My Blocks PDF (downloads).  The Fitted Dress block has to be one of my favourites and the best place to start for fabulous dress designs.

Trawling through my blog post archive I've come to realise that many of my posts have vintage content, and I discover there are at least twenty vintage posts!  So this Vintage Inspired Round-Up is to refresh your memory of some of my earlier Pattern Puzzle posts and to share a few points in history where vintage style has influenced my work.  Where does it all start?
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