intermediate Tag

This weeks #PatternPuzzle is not an exact copy of the Charles James Skirt but a very do-able pattern for a 101 approach to understanding darts to drape in flat pattern making.  No really, that's what I used to call the workshop; so formal and so academic. :]  This Charles James skirt has so many complex panels that it started to send me a little crazy, so the decision was made to modify and simplify.

The designs used in last Saturdays #PatternPuzzle conversation are the surplus design developments from the Layered Shirt post of a few weeks ago.  They have been lying around on the work table all that time and I didn't have the heart to throw them out.  Then I realised, that was because I really wanted these two tops for myself.  They were just the kind of thing I needed in my wardrobe.  Saved from the shredder, these designs are similar but different enough to entice you to make both.  I will be dealing with them in two separate posts to make sure I cover all the detail. :)

The post is a little late this week as I am totally distracted by work that is going on in the backend of the website, setting up a members area.  We have been working out the best content to make it both attractive and useful to fans and hope to open that members area very soon.  Now back to the #PatternPuzzle that was such fun on Saturday with fans working getting to the answers super-fast.  Then overnight, while I was asleep so many added sketches and photos and in one case an amazing mini-toile.

The vintage inspiration for this weeks #PatternPuzzle has come from a pattern I found on the So Vintage Patterns website.  Unfortunately, this particular one has been sold but they have a mountain of great vintage patterns for all eras.  I was attracted by the asymmetrically-set,  diagonal seams with gathered drape.  But not so much the button decoration.  By adding the extra seams I believe I have made it easier to construct as they eliminate the corner seams.  I have also reworked the back view from the original design to carry the front diagonal seams through to the back dress.

This weeks puzzle is very much a summer weight shirt that I imagine in a cotton voile or organdie.  The semi-transparent fabric is used in many layers (2-3) to create drape and subtle colour variation in the layering.  The front opening of the shirt is a concealed, button-front hidden under the front drape.

Since the earliest of my pattern making days I have had a passion for the tailored femininity of vintage styling.  And now that I have discovered an extensive online community that enjoys both fashion and vintage designs I am presented with so many beautiful options for our weekly pattern puzzle.   I found this weeks inspiring image in a wonderful tumblr blog, The Tailors Desire, full of all things vintage.  :)

You may be forgiven for thinking that we often torture the stuffing out of our fabulous #PatternPuzzle fans.  Well, last Saturday was no exception.  I did a slightly tricky thing with a 'grown-on hood' and it was enough to make the pattern shapes very hard to read.  I have seen similar styles in both historic and current fashion and have waited some time to try this out on the blog.  The idea I have is to cut this dress from my knit block using a merino jersey.  That could be either a one-way or two-way stretch knit.  The Double Drape in this Maxi refers to the #CowlDrape on the back of this dress and the #GatheredDrape on the centre front (CF) seam.  The hood styling may also be considered a #CowlDrape with the large tuck and the centre back (CB) line on the fold.

A huge thanks to all the fans that turned up on Saturday to play and watch the #PatternPuzzle.  This weeks puzzle was less complex than most but a favourite for the wardrobe.  Our post this week has two versions of the Tucked Drape Top, the first with two large tucks facing each other on the front neckline and the second with one large tuck only in the front neckline.

It was a demanding Pattern Puzzle this week that ran live across all time zones and gave everyone a chance to join in.  You can see by the pattern shapes below that the final move of adding the front side panel to the backside panel was just enough to make it a very challenging game.  Huge thanks to all fans and friends for dropping by and making it a great day.

This weeks #PatternPuzzle was about targeting another of my favourite Erté designs and bringing this inspiration up-to-date.  As it turns out this is a truly challenging style.  I know I made at least two mistakes in putting these pattern making instructions together.  So please forgive any other errors you may find.  And because of its complexity, I imagine I would have to produce at least 2-3 toiles/muslins to really get the design and fit to work well before attempting in final cloth.
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